Podcast: Leslie Kaminoff on Back Pain, Dr. Sarno and the Power of Breath

Meet Leslie Kaminoff…

Meet Leslie Kaminoff, a Yoga educator with forty years experience in the study of Yoga and the breath. Leslie studied with T.K.V Desikachar, a teacher renowned for his emphasis on the therapeutic aspects of yoga, and he is the co-author of the bestselling book Yoga Anatomy.

Listen to Like ‘Mind, Like Body’ podcastYogi Leslie Kaminoff on Back Pain, Dr. Sarno and the Power of Breath

Leslie shares his own personal story of losing his breath for six months, having what he calls a “pranic breakdown,” overcoming severe back spasms, and watching his hero suffer from dementia. He’ll also share what he’s learned about how simple breathing habits and basic yoga practice can transform the way we face adversity taking us from reactive to responsive.

LISTEN NOW


Specifically Designed Online Yoga Anatomy Course

Leslie and Amy have designed an online Yoga Anatomy course specifically for our Yoga Teacher Training 500 hour Diploma Course. We are lucky to have this comprehensive Yoga Anatomy online component as part of our training.
Is extremely generous with content.
This course exposes students to a variety of ways to understand the human body – including western anatomy and physiology, functional anatomy, kinesiology and how this all this integrates with yoga practices such as the asana (posture), breathing techniques, use of the bandhas and more.

How can we support you?

Leslie is coming to Sydney for a 2 day workshop in March 2020: More information and bookings 

Interested in yoga teacher training? More information

What is iRest®?

We are excited to be hosting iRest® for the 4th consecutive year in Sydney 2020. There are no prerequisites for this training, iRest® is for every one to enjoy!

“If yoga were a smorgasbord, the practice of iRest® would most definitely be at the dessert table.”

What is iRest®?

iRest® is a meditation practice based on the ancient tradition of Yoga Nidra and adapted to suit the conditions of modern life. When practiced regularly – a little and often – iRest® enables you to meet each moment of your life with unshakable peace and wellbeing, no matter how challenging or difficult your situation.

Why Do iRest®?

  • Cope with Daily Stress: iRest® helps you see situations from a fresh perspective and find your equilibrium no matter what life throws your way.
  • Resolve Trauma: iRest® is an evidence-based form of guided meditation that has been shown to resolve symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
  • Decrease Depression and Anxiety: Some people who suffer from depression or anxiety find it beneficial to do an iRest® practice first thing in the morning, or just before going to sleep at night.
  • Relieve Chronic Pain: With iRest® meditation, people have found relief from chronic pain that medication and other pain-management programs have been unable to resolve.
  • Improve Sleep: Practicing iRest® can help you fall asleep more easily and experience more restful sleep throughout the night.
  • Awaken to Your True Nature: The comprehensive spiritual teachings of iRest® enable you to experience your indestructible ground of well-being.

Who Can iRest® Help?

iRest® provides workshops, trainings, and certification for individuals wanting to hone their meditation practice, and professionals looking to integrate meditation skills and Yoga Nidra into their offerings. These will not only serve to help yoga teachers, yoga therapists, and psychotherapists, but healthcare, military, and individuals in general as well.

 


Meet your facilitator: Fuyuko Sawamura

Fuyuko Sawamura-Toyota is a certified iRest® Senior Trainer, Retreat Leader and Supervisor/Mentor. For the past 20 years she has been deeply committed on the path of Yoga and ancient Non-dual wisdom. She is also a qualified Hatha Yoga teacher since 1996.
She incorporates iRest and Self-Inquiry in her teachings of Yoga, Somatic body awareness and meditation at her yoga studio “Prema Yoga” on the Gold Coast, Australia and internationally.
In 2007, Richard Miller, her spiritual mentor, brought to Fuyuko a deeper understanding of living life in a non dual way. From a life of ever deepening joy, astonishment and Stillness, a heartfelt desire to share these precious teachings has sprung forth. She teaches and hosts iRest trainings and retreats in Australia. She has been assisting iRest trainings in North America for Richard Miller and other senior trainers.

I am deeply grateful for Fuyuko’s ability to bring these precious nondual teachings forward into the world. I hope you take advantage of sharing time with Fuyuko in her upcoming offerings.”


How can we support you?

Join iRest® Level 1 Training in Crows Nest (Sydney)
Friday 14th February (evening only) – Wednesday 19th February, 2020

More information and bookings

Ayurveda Recipe: The Power of Kitchari

Calling all kapha and vatta dosha!

Have you been looking for your next go to meal?

We have you covered. Try kitchari!

Think of kitchari as the vegetarian equivalent of Grandma’s chicken soup, with much more fiber.

If your belly feels sluggish after too many treats, kitchari is an easy way to cleanse your digestion and restore freshness. Kitchari offers a true delight to both your body and senses.

To maximize the many benefits your will receive from kitchari, eat it for several meals in a row, such as lunch and dinner on the same day. It may just become addictive!

Kitchari

This kitchari is especially suited to Kapha and Vata dosha.

Ingredients:

  • 1 c BASMATI RICE
  • 4 leaves BAY LEAF
  • 1/2 c CHICK PEA (GARBANZO)
  • 1/2 tsp CINNAMON
  • 1/4 tsp CLOVES
  • 1 inch GINGER (FRESH)
  • 2 tbsp. OLIVE OIL
  • 1/4 tsp SALT (MINERAL SALT)
  • 4 c WATER

Preparation of this healthy recipe:

As easy as 1, 2, 3…

1. If using dried chick peas, soak the chick pea overnight and drain. Then, add 6c water and bring to a boil, scooping off any foam that forms on the top.

2. Strain out the liquid, and add another 4c of fresh water and return to a boil. Add the ginger, cinnamon and cloves. Cook for one hour.

3. Add rice and any remaining ingredients to broth. Stir. Cover and cook on low heat for 20-25 minutes or until grains are tender.

 

Don’t know your Ayurveda body type? No problem!

No need to stress if you don’t know whether you’re a kapha, vata, or pitta dosha.

Check out our recent blog, What Is Your Ayurveda Body Type?, to take the free quiz!

 

ENJOY!


Meet your facilitator: Eleni Tsikrikas

Eleni discovered YOGA as a means for reducing stress in 1995 while practicing law in Sydney, Australia. Smitten, Eleni completed the Sydney Yoga Centre’s teacher training course. In 2000, Eleni quit the legal profession to teach Yoga full time. In 2004 Eleni moved to Los Angeles and began intensive study with Robert Birnberg a senior student in the T. Krichnamacharya lineage. The major focus of her studies is the “Yoga Sutras of Pantajali” the guidebook dedicated to creating a satvic mind.
Eleni is a Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist, CAS, a Pancha Karma Specialist PKS. She runs a private ayurvedic practice and teaches “Ayurvedic Skills for Living” courses in Silverlake and Sydney. She is a faculty member of The Yoga Institute in Sydney and at California College of Ayurveda, where she teaches and mentors students. She continues to pursue her passion for herbs, studying with renowned herbalist KP Khalsa. Eleni has completed the educational component leading to qualifications as a Western Herbalist. She is presently working on the accreditation process for the American Herbalist Guild.
Eleni passionately believes food is medicine and is looking forward to sharing her passion at The Yoga Institute with a monthly Ayuveda Workshop.


How can we support you?

Join our next monthly Ayurveda Workshop in Cammeray:

MORE INFORMATION AND BOOK MY PLACE

The Medical Chest: Dry Massage- Garshana

By Eleni Tsikrikas

Dry Brushing- Garshana

Dry brushing is one of Ayurveda’s daily self care steps. It promotes skin renewal, exfoliation and the elimination of toxins and impurities. The result is soft, firm, glowing skin.

Winter and Spring are considered the best seasons to dry brush. During these seasons its cold and dry or cold and moist. Cold slows things down and can increase sluggishness in the body mind. When Vata predominates, skin is thin, cold and dry. If Kapha predominates skin is thick, clammy with sluggish circulation.

Dry brushing warms and stimulates the skin bringing greater blood flow to the surface. Up to one third of toxins produced daily by the body are eliminated through the skin. As we age, our bodies ability to shed the outer layers of skin decreases. This leads to less efficient elimination of toxins, and places extra stress on other toxin removing organs – like the liver and kidneys.

Removing dry and dead skin cells by dry brushing each morning leaves the skin nourished and oxygenated. This practice improves the body’s ability to eliminate toxins and the function of sweat and secretion glands, turning your body back into the well oiled machine it should be.

The massage should only take about 5 minutes and is best done upon rising.

Vata types tend towards thin dry skin so, gentle massage, once a week is sufficient.
Pitta types tend towards warm sensitive skin so a couple times a week with medium friction is best. Less in summer.
Kapha types should do this as a daily ritual as they tend towards thicker skin and may hold on to fluids.

 

The Process

Tools needed:

  • A hand sized, soft, natural bristle brush or loofa mitt or silk gloves. Avoid synthetic fiber brushes and puffs because they are too rough.

How to:

  • Before bathing
  • Be gentle at first, the skin will become seasoned after a few weeks
  • Take extra care of tender areas
  • Avoid any problem spots, such as rashes or sores
  • As you acclimatize to the sensation, rub your skin quickly and fairly vigorously
  • Long strokes over the long bones such as the arms and legs
  • Use small circular movements for the joints of the shoulders, elbows, wrists, etc
  • Begin with the soles & brush upwards
  • If cellulite is an issue spend some time giving positive attention to those areas. Always finish any area with gentle strokes towards the heart
  • Progress from the legs to the hands and arms, brushing towards the shoulders. Next brush the head, ears and down the neck. Finish with the torso
  • Use the long wooden handle, brush your entire back then proceed to the front
  • Going in a clockwise motion around the belly button helps digestion
  • Be aware, this is a time to enjoy being with your body
  • Breath deeply while you brush
  • You can say nice things to yourself, such as “I love this body and see it radiantly healthy and filled with vitality”
  • Abhyanga or self oil massage, should be done after dry body brushing
  • Vata types finish with a warm shower or bath
  • Kapha and Pitta, types, finishing with a cool to cold rinse is beneficial as it closes the pores of the skin and stimulates circulation

Benefits

  • Boosts immunity & enhances circulation
  • Increases body appreciation, encourages well being, releases tension
  • Exfoliates and maintains skins vital functions of excretion & absorption
  • Stimulates hormone function
  • Activates pores to remove waste material
  • Increases blood and lymphatic circulation
  • Helps digestion and colon function
  • Removes excess heat of pitta and stagnation of kapha

for all these reasons, dry- brushing is an excellent routine to add to our day and weekly skincare routine.

 

Eleni discovered YOGA as a means for reducing stress in 1995 while practicing law in Sydney, Australia. Smitten, Eleni completed the Sydney Yoga Centre’s teacher training course. In 2000, Eleni quit the legal profession to teach Yoga full time. In 2004 Eleni moved to Los Angeles and began intensive study with Robert Birnberg a senior student in the T. Krichnamacharya lineage. The major focus of her studies is the “Yoga Sutras of Pantajali” the guidebook dedicated to creating a satvic mind.

Eleni is a Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist, CAS, a Pancha Karma Specialist PKS. She runs a private ayurvedic practice and teaches “Ayurvedic Skills for Living” courses in Silverlake and Sydney. She is a faculty member of The Yoga Institute in Sydney and at California College of Ayurveda, where she teaches and mentors students. She continues to pursue her passion for herbs, studying with renowned herbalist KP Khalsa. Eleni has completed the educational component leading to qualifications as a Western Herbalist. She is presently working on the accreditation process for the American Herbalist Guild.

Eleni passionately believes food is medicine and is looking forward to sharing her passion at The Yoga Institute with a monthly Ayuveda Workshop.


How can we support you?

Join our monthly Ayurveda Workshop“The People’s Medicine” with Eleni:

More information and bookings

What Is Your Ayurveda Body Type?

By Eleni Tsikrikas

What is Ayurveda?          

Ayurveda is a system of health & wellness developed in ancient India over 5,000 years ago. At the core of Ayurveda is a functional medicine approach based on a simple classification system. This system matches diet, lifestyle, and herbs to the individual to improve health & wellness.

What Are the Ayurveda Body Types?

The 3 functional body types (doshas), are Catabolic (Vata), Metabolic (Pitta), and Anabolic (Kapha). Catabolic individuals tend to break down body mass into energy. Metabolic individuals tend to burn or use energy. Anabolic individuals tend to store energy as body mass. Catabolic people tend to be easily stimulated, hyperactive, underweight and dry. Metabolic people tend to be rosy-cheeked, easily irritated, focused, driven, and easily inflamed. Anabolic people are heavy, stable and grounded, but if they store too much energy, they could gain weight easily and have congestion.

How do I find out which body type I am?

Great news! Joyful Belly has approximately 15 different quizzes you can take. The first, Get My Body Type, is a minute-long quiz which will tell you your Ayurveda body type right away. You may even be a combination of two different body types. The quiz results will tell you diets, lifestyles, and herbs to incorporate more in your everyday routines. Once complete, you can take other quizzes to complete your full body assessment. Then, go exploring the website for recipes, health remedies, and other recommendation specific to your body type.

What body type am I?


Meet your facilitator: Eleni Tsikrikas

Eleni discovered YOGA as a means for reducing stress in 1995 while practicing law in Sydney, Australia. Smitten, Eleni completed the Sydney Yoga Centre’s teacher training course. In 2000, Eleni quit the legal profession to teach Yoga full time. In 2004 Eleni moved to Los Angeles and began intensive study with Robert Birnberg a senior student in the T. Krichnamacharya lineage. The major focus of her studies is the “Yoga Sutras of Pantajali” the guidebook dedicated to creating a satvic mind.

Eleni is a Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist, CAS, a Pancha Karma Specialist PKS. She runs a private ayurvedic practice and teaches “Ayurvedic Skills for Living” courses in Silverlake and Sydney. She is a faculty member of The Yoga Institute in Sydney and at California College of Ayurveda, where she teaches and mentors students. She continues to pursue her passion for herbs, studying with renowned herbalist KP Khalsa. Eleni has completed the educational component leading to qualifications as a Western Herbalist. She is presently working on the accreditation process for the American Herbalist Guild.

Eleni passionately believes food is medicine and is looking forward to sharing her passion at The Yoga Institute with a monthly Ayuveda Workshop.

Monthly Ayurveda Workshop info and booking

Leslie Kaminoff’s The Breathing Project Timeline

What is The Breathing Project?

Leslie Kaminoff founded The Breathing Project in 2001 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to the sharing of educational, community-based programming related to yoga, anatomy and health enrichment. From 2003 until mid-2017 the main vehicle for this mission was the physical studio we ran in New York City.
The Breathing Project is continuing its mission of community service by producing and co-sponsoring workshops, immersions, symposia and publications featuring thought leaders from the fields of yoga, anatomy, somatics and other allied fields.

Click photo below to check  it out!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specifically Designed Online Yoga Anatomy Course

Leslie and Amy have designed an online Yoga Anatomy course specifically for our Yoga Teacher Training 500 hour Diploma Course. We are lucky to have this comprehensive Yoga Anatomy online component as part of our training.
Is extremely generous with content.
This course exposes students to a variety of ways to understand the human body – including western anatomy and physiology, functional anatomy, kinesiology and how this all this integrates with yoga practices such as the asana (posture), breathing techniques, use of the bandhas and more.
Interested in teacher training? More information

About the facilitator: Leslie Kaminoff 

Leslie Kaminoff is a yoga educator inspired by the tradition of T.K.V. Desikachar. He is recognized internationally as a specialist in the fields of yoga, breath anatomy and bodywork. For over four decades he has led workshops and developed specialized education for many leading yoga associations, schools and training programs in America and throughout the world. His approach to teaching combines intellectual rigor, spontaneity and humor, and is always evolving.

Leslie is the founder of The Breathing Project, a New York City based educational non-profit dedicated to advancing educational standards for yoga teachers and other movement professionals. His unique year-long course is available online at yogaanatomy.net.
He is the co-author, with Amy Matthews, of the best-selling book “Yoga Anatomy.”


How can we support you?

Leslie is coming to Sydney for a 2 day workshop in March 2020: More information and bookings 


Bonus Material 

Negative Feedback Can Be Positive (except when it’s just negative)
http://yogaanatomy.org/feedback-loop/

Son vs Father’s Yoga Teachings
http://yogaanatomy.org/back_to_the_future/

A simple breathing question with a complex answer
http://yogaanatomy.org/a-simple-question-with-a-complex-answer/

Honesty in Yoga Credentialing
http://yogaanatomy.org/you-were-her

Is Yoga Therapy Always Gentle? It Depends

By Lisa Grauaug

Therapeutic yoga is often considered to be a gentle practice. This is not always the case and it will depend on the person you are working with.

Myth debunk: Therapeutic yoga is boring, slow and for the old and the sick

In therapeutic yoga a range of  yoga based practices may be recommended for our clients . And sometimes it is more appropriate to offer a strong asana practice based on the breath.

For example:It could be appropriate to offer a strong therapeutic practice for a person who is constitutionally relatively fit and athletic in nature. In fact a gentle yoga practice may not provide the motivation to inspire this person to commit to their practice daily.

It is important to note that we can work with a stronger physical practice that is therapeutic while maintaining a sense of steadiness and ease. The practices we provide meet the student where they are at.

Case Study:  MARY

  • 43 year old female (married, mother of 3)
  • Physically able
  • Enjoys exercise attends gym 4 times per week
  • Currently feeling exhausted and the overall demands of work and family
  • Lacking energy (often wakes feeing tired and at the end of the day)
  • Mild digestive issues (bloating, poor appetite)
  • Mary has a ‘push push push’ ‘go go go’ mentality. And often is thinking about others and a desire to remain fit and strong for her family.

Yoga was suggested by her GP

  • Stress management
  • Maintain physical strength
  • Increase energy levels
  • Improve digestion
  • Improve quality of sleep

The Practice:

Mary was advised to substitute her gym training sessions for a daily yoga practice.

The task of the Yoga Therapist is to find an appropriate yoga practice that will support Mary’s physical and mental health.

In summary the practice:

  • Breath-centred
  • A morning practice that includes both energising and calming aspects
  • Focus on postures that facilitate the exhalation.
  • Moments of rest

Written by Lisa Grauaug B AppSc (Nursing), B Psych, M Psych, Adv Dip Yoga Teaching, Ayurveda Lifestyle Certificate, Perinatal Mental Health Course (USyd), Registered Psychologist, Registered Yoga Teacher, Registered Yoga Therapist(YA & IAYT), Yoga Australia Member. 


How can we support you?

Interested Yoga Therapy training ?
Yoga Therapy Foundations module (50 hours):  MORE information please
Yoga Therapy Training (650 hours): MORE information please

The Medical Chest: Winter Tonic / Kashaya Tea

By Eleni Tsikrikas

The goal of the medicine chest is to introduce you to the wonderful world of herbs and their many uses. Herbs have traditionally been used as foods, supplements and to cure ailments. Their use can help support your health from a very basic level, just as foods do.

Winter recipe to keep you heathy this winter.

Winter Tonic / Kashaya Tea

A sweet and spicy herbal drink form South India prepared using aromatic spices based in Ayurveda.

Health Benefits

Kashaya can cure nagging colds, chest colds, loss of appetite, clear sinuses, and nausea. Its a wonderful substitute for caffeinated loaded drinks and it aids in weight loss.
  • Part 1 Making Kashaya Powder
  • 1 cup coriander seeds
  • 1/3 cup cumin seeds
  • 1/4 cup fennel seeds
  • 1-2 TBS black peppercorns
  • 1-2 tsp dry ginger ( optional)

Dry roast the herbs separately on a low flame till the heady aroma of the spices fills your home. Spread the roasted spices on a wide plate and let them cool to room temperature. Grind al the spices along with the ginger root to a fine powder and store in an air tight jar.

Part 2. Making Kashaya Drink

  • 1 heaped tsp Kashaya powder
  • 1/4 cup milk( add more or less based on your preference) I use coconut milk
  • 1 cup water1/2-1TBS Jaggery/molasses/coconut sugar. Adjust for taste
  • 1/2 tsp cinamon, a pinch of cardamom or turmeric powder( optional)

Take 1 cup water in a sauce pan and bring to boil. Once water has come to a boil, mix a heaped tsp of kashaya powder and sweetener to taste. Let it boil for 1 minute and mix in 1/4 cup milk along with cardamom, cinnamon/turmeric powder if using. Switch off flame and let rest for one minute for the flavors to infuse. Strain it through a fine sieve and drink whilst hot.

adapted from my Herbalist teachers notes. KP Singh Khalsa- Natural Healing Specialist www.kpkhalsa.com

Herb Profiles:

Coriander – Improves digestion, Rich in antioxidants, Normalizes blood sugar and cholesterol, fights infection. Use in combination with Fennel and cumin will strengthen digestion without aggravating pitta
Safety profile: if have allergic reaction to cilantro then avoid coriander

Cumin – Great warming spice for all types, gas reducing, rich in flavonoidse, excellent source of iron and minerals,Stimulates and strengthens digestion, Regulates blood sugar helps to normalize cholesterol, demonstrated cancer fighting potential, prevents bone loss, kills bad bacteria (traditionally used to preserve food)
Safety profile: excellent safety profile

Fennel – Strengthens Digestion, reduces intestinal gas and cramping making it an effective pain reliever, reduces inflammation, kills toxins, powerful antioxidant, cancer fighter
Safety rating: excellent safety profile

Cinnamon – Great warming spice for irregular agni, Increases circulation, reduces intestinal spasms and gas,  lowers cholesterol and blood sugar, reduces inflammation, anti microbial
Safety Profile: safe in doses of 1 tsp daily

Cardamom – Cardamon is a relative of Ginger and Turmeric. It increases digestion, particularly heavy, hard to digest food, warming anti mucous herb, pain relieving, anti-spasmodic, anti-inflammatory. Sprinkled in coffee will reduce acidity and mucous from milk
Safety Profile: No herb drug

Turmeric – Blood purifier, liver restorative, antimicrobial and anti bacterial, antioxidant,  anti inflammatory, anti cancer, Its nourishing to the heart. Helps with blood circulation and stops the formation of new plaque.Reduces existing plaque in the arteries.It protects the liver by increase bile flow. It normalizes cholesterol and has been used in the treatment of diabetes. It strengthens digestion & helps to restore intestinal flora.

ENJOY!


Meet your facilitator: Eleni Tsikrikas

Eleni discovered YOGA as a means for reducing stress in 1995 while practicing law in Sydney, Australia. Smitten, Eleni completed the Sydney Yoga Centre’s teacher training course. In 2000, Eleni quit the legal profession to teach Yoga full time. In 2004 Eleni moved to Los Angeles and began intensive study with Robert Birnberg a senior student in the T. Krichnamacharya lineage. The major focus of her studies is the “Yoga Sutras of Pantajali” the guidebook dedicated to creating a satvic mind.

Eleni is a Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist, CAS, a Pancha Karma Specialist PKS. She runs a private ayurvedic practice and teaches “Ayurvedic Skills for Living” courses in Silverlake and Sydney. She is a faculty member of The Yoga Institute in Sydney and at California College of Ayurveda, where she teaches and mentors students. She continues to pursue her passion for herbs, studying with renowned herbalist KP Khalsa. Eleni has completed the educational component leading to qualifications as a Western Herbalist. She is presently working on the accreditation process for the American Herbalist Guild.

Eleni passionately believes food is medicine and is looking forward to sharing her passion at The Yoga Institute with a monthly Ayuveda Workshop.

Monthly Ayurveda Workshop info and booking

Yoga Therapy: A DOORWAY to revealing story

By Lisa Grauaug

A key focus in a Yoga Therapy session is understanding our client’s perspective and this includes “what would they like to gain from the Yoga Therapy sessions?”

This question is foundational and one that forms part of a greater reflection for the client and therapist.

For example
A client’s initial focus for the Yoga Therapy sessions may be that they would like to be physically free of chronic pain. The client has shared that they have tried other therapies and they are still struggling, expressing feelings of helplessness and being lost about what to do next?

Opening the doorway
As a Yoga Therapist I focus on facilitating this request. In the session/s, I will spend time developing an understanding of the client’s story around the chronic pain, utilising key questions and observational skills. I am also particularly interested in understanding how their health challenge maybe restricting their current daily activities of living and life in general.

The doorway has been opened
Curiosity then opens up a new doorway to looking at other aspects of their story. This may include aspects about what they value in life. Such as the value of wellbeing, value of spending quality time with their children, value of being support to their partner or their value of being productive at work etc. A fresh shared understanding of the client’s story is unveiled.

A well-trained Yoga Therapist is taught how to provide space which enables client’s to share their story, no stone is left unturned– and from this story we broaden perspective & find windows to facilitate steps forward and positive change.


How can we support you?

Interested Yoga Therapy training ?
Yoga Therapy Foundations module (50 hours):  MORE information please
Yoga Therapy Training (650 hours): MORE information please

Post Pregnancy Care: What Works

By Lisa Grauaug

An appropriate Prenatal yoga practice is designed to prevent Diastasis Rectus Abdominis….

WHAT IS Diastasis Rectus Abdominis?

An intricate layer of connective tissue sits between the rectus abdominis muscles ( RA or “6 pack abs”) and the transversus abdominis- it is called the linea alba. The linea –alba is designed during pregnancy to thin out which allows for accommodating the growing baby inutero. Post –pregnancy the linea alba then thickens up.

Approximately 33 % of women post-birth are diagnosed with Diastasis rectus abdominis (OR diastasis recti). Where the space between the rectus abdomens muscle has not returned to a near normal state.

There are factors that have been reported to increase ones chances of experiencing DRA in pregnancy and this include 

  • 35+ in age
  • Multiple pregnancy (twins, triplets, etc.)
  • High birth weight baby
  • Repeated pregnancies

There are easy ways to assess for this condition. And it is considered to be caused by overstretching or abdominal straining. Inappropriate physical activity during pregnancy (including Yoga) can also place a woman at risk for this condition.

To prevent and treat particular care is recommended during pregnancy and post-birth.

As a Yoga Teacher it is important if you are teaching women during pregnancy and post-birth that you are aware of the postures that may not be suitable to avoid any un-necessary over-straining of the abdominal muscles. The yoga practice post-birth is different to a pregnancy yoga practice and will focus on appropriate abdominal toning through the intelligent use of the breath and postures (asana). An appropriate post-birth practice will facilitate the rectus abdominus muscles returning to a near normal condition.


How can we support you?

Interested in teaching Pre and Post-natal Yoga? Our 50hr post-graduate training is designed for yoga teachers to expand their skills and knowledge to be able to teach pre and post-natal yoga in group classes and one-on-one.

MORE information please

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